Oklahoma Water Resources Board the Water Agency

 

2014 | 2013



August 20, 2014

Antlers Public Works Authority Receives OWRB Loan to Refinance Water System Debt

The Antlers Public Works Authority has received a $3,110,000 loan through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to help refinance loans previously used to improve the community’s water and wastewater infrastructure. The OWRB approved the loan during the agency’s monthly board meeting on August 19.

The Antlers Public Works Authority was created on October 22, 1962, and currently serves 1,191 water customers and 1,063 sewer customers. Antlers Mayor Mike Burrage, Joel Taylor, City Manager, and Robin Byrum, City Clerk, attended the OWRB board meeting in support of the loan application.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the water systems’ customers will save an estimated $1.8 million, over the life of the 18.5-year loan, compared to traditional financing. The DWSRF loan shall be secured by a lien on the revenues of the water, sewer, and sanitation systems, the proceeds of a $.75 cent sales tax, and a mortgage on the water and sewer systems.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Jerry Ellis and State Rep. R.C. Pruett for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


August 20, 2014

Southern Osage County Rural Water District Receives OWRB Loan to Improve Water System

Rural Water Management District No. 15 in Osage County has received an $840,000 loan through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to construct a 300,000 gallon water storage tower. The OWRB approved the loan during the agency’s monthly board meeting on August 19.

RWMD No. 15, located just north of Skiatook Lake in Osage County, was created on June 20, 1966, and currently serves 2,585 customers. Johnna Huddleston, the system’s Office Clerk, and Brad Pleima, the project engineer, attended the OWRB board meeting in support of the loan application.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the water systems’ customers will save an estimated $131,632, over the life of the 20-year loan, compared to traditional financing. The DWSRF loan shall be secured by a lien on the system’s revenues and may include a mortgage on the system’s real property.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Eddie Fields and State Rep. Sean Roberts for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Colbert Public Utilities Authority Receives $950,000 Wastewater System Loan from OWRB

The Colbert Public Utilities Authority received a $950,000 loan Tuesday from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to facilitate improvements to the community’s wastewater infrastructure. The OWRB approved the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) loan during the panel’s regular monthly meeting.

The loan proceeds will help convert the primary lagoon into two aerated lagoons, remove sludge, reconstruct the main lift station, as well as rehabilitate the flow meters, valves, outlet boxes, rip-rap, yard piping, and lagoon dikes.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the Colbert Public Utilities Authority’s customers will save an estimated $331,651, over the life of the 20-year loan, compared to traditional financing. The CWSRF loan shall be secured with a lien on the revenues of the water, wastewater, and sanitation systems. The Authority currently serves 923 water customers and 430 sewer customers. In addition to the OWRB’s CWSRF loan, the project also has been awarded a $300,000 Community Development Block Grant from the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Colbert officials attending the OWRB’s monthly meeting in support of the loan application included Doug McCleary, Engineer, and Charles Rainbolt, Bond Counsel.

Since 1983, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to the state legislators in Bryan County for their support of our financial assistance programs,” said J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.


July 16, 2014

Colcord Public Works Authority Receives $84,000 Grant to Repair Waste Water System

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Colcord Public Works Authority has received an $84,000 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

Colcord owns and operates a water system consisting of a water treatment facility, one water well, booster pump station, water storage tank and water lines with the size ranging from 1-inch to 6-inch. The system currently is under a Consent Order from the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality regarding non-availability of back up source of water. In addition, several of the water system’s components have deteriorated after reaching the end of their functional capacity.

In order to provide safe, reliable and adequate delivery of water to the system’s customers, the Authority is proposing improvements to their water system including cleaning, inspecting and repainting the outside and inside of the existing water tower, installing a new inlet pipe to the water storage tank, and conducting several miscellaneous repairs to the ladder, roof, level indicator, and overflow pipe.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Colcord’s 271 customers more than $151,200 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Wayne Shaw and State Rep. William Fourkiller for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Davidson Public Works Authority Receives $149,900 Grant to Repair Water System

The Davidson Public Works Authority has received a $149,900 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

The grant will be used to improve the system’s water line pressure and the storage capacity. The proposed project includes construction of a 120-foot tall water stand pipe next to the existing overhead storage tank. The water system currently consists of water wells, a 50,000 gallon overhead storage tank, a water blending station, and distribution lines. The water from the wells is currently blended with water purchased from Town of Frederick. The Authority currently serves 315 customers.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save the Authority’s customers more than $269,820 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Don Barrington and State Rep. Don Armes for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Dewar Public Works Authority Receives $63,112 Grant to Repair Waste Water System

The Dewar Public Works Authority has received a $63,112 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s waste water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

The grant will be used for the removal and replacement of 700-feet of 8-inch sewer lines with new PVC sewer lines of the same size, and to replace three of the system’s existing manholes with new concrete manholes. Dewar’s sanitary sewer system consists of collection lines and a wastewater treatment facility.

The sewer system is under a Consent Order from the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) regarding high inflow and infiltration in their collection system contributing to shortened detention times in their lagoon system. The Authority is proposing the sanitary sewer collection system improvements in order to correct the issues with ODEQ.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Dewar’s 888 citizens $113,602 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Roger Ballenger and State Rep. Jerry Shoemake for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Fairfax Public Works Authority Receives $81,380 Grant to Repair Water and Waste Water System

The Fairfax Public Works Authority has received an $81,380 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water and waste water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

The proposed project will include correcting a number of issues with the system’s water intake pipes and existing sewer system lines. The grant funding will be used specifically to construct 300-feet of 12-inch HDPE water intake pipe, 950-feet of 8-inch PVC sanitary sewer pipe, three new man holes, and other related construction. Many existing water intake pipes and sewer lines are beyond their service life, and the project is being proposed to correct those issues.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Fairfax’s 717 customers $146,484 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Eddie Fields, and State Reps. Sean Roberts and Steve Vaughan, for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Fort Supply Public Works Authority Receives $59,000 Grant to Improve Water System

The Fort Supply Public Works Authority has received a $59,000 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to help plan a project to improve the community’s water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

The requested grant funds will be used by the Authority to pay for the engineering portion of a project to eventually construct 8,790-feet of six-inch PVC water line, 28 six-inch gate valves and boxes, 18 fire hydrants, and other related construction.

Fort Supply’s water system currently consists of a master meter for purchase of water from City of Woodward, one 100,000 gallons stand pipe for water storage, and water distribution lines ranging from 2-inch to 6-inch. The water lines are mainly cast iron pipes installed in the 1930’s with some newer PVC pipes included. The town has experienced numerous problems of water line breakage because of their very old cast iron pipes.

In order to provide safe, reliable and adequate delivery of water to its customers, Fort Supply is proposing improvements to their water system that will require a preliminary engineering study and report, survey and staking, and other engineering planning support. The total cost of the improvements including the engineering fee is estimated as $358,750.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Fort Supply’s 172 customers $109,200 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Bryce Marlatt and State Rep. Gus Blackwell for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Panama Public Works Authority Receives $1,025,000 Wastewater System Loan from OWRB

The Panama Public Works Authority received a $1,025,000 loan Tuesday from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB). The OWRB approved the Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan during the panel’s regular monthly meeting. The loan proceeds will be used refinance loans that the Authority had obtained previously to finance wastewater system improvement projects in past years.

According to Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, the Panama Public Works Authority’s customers will save an estimated $258,077 in interest charges, over the life of the 17 and a half-year loan, compared to traditional financing. The CWSRF loan will be secured with a lien on the revenues of the wastewater system. The Authority currently serves 554 water customers and 528 sewer customers. Panama officials attending the OWRB’s monthly meeting in support of the loan application included the Panama Public Works Authority Chairman Lloyd Hale, and El Doris Weaver, Clerk.

Since 1983, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Mark Allen and State Rep. Ed Cannaday for their support of our financial assistance programs,” said J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.


July 16, 2014

Ravia Public Works Authority Receives $63,000 Grant to Improve Water System

The Ravia Public Works Authority has received a $63,000 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

The Town of Ravia owns and operates a water system consisting of one 150,000 gallon steel water storage tank and water distribution lines ranging in size from two-inch to eight-inch in diameter. Ravia has experienced numerous problems of water line breakage because of the system’s very old distribution lines. In order to provide safe, reliable and adequate delivery of water to its customers, the Authority is proposing the construction of 300-feet of eight-inch PVC water line, 700-feet of six-inch PVC water line, street surface repairs, and other related construction.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Ravia’s 272 customers $113,400 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Frank Simpson and State Rep. Charles McCall for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Rogers County Rural Water District Receives $2,175,000 Loan from OWRB

The Rogers County Rural Water District No. 8 received a $2,175,000 loan Tuesday from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) in order to achieve substantial savings on the district’s outstanding water improvement project debt. The OWRB approved the Financial Assistance Program (FAP) loan during the panel’s regular monthly meeting. The loan proceeds will be used refinance loans that the Authority had obtained previously to finance water system improvement projects in past years.

According to Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, the 1,207 customers of Rogers County RWD No. 8 will save an estimated $376,333 in interest charges, over the life of the 26-year loan, compared to traditional financing. The FAP loan will be secured with a lien on the revenues of the water system. Rogers County RWD No. 8 officials attending the OWRB’s monthly meeting in support of the loan application included District Manager Josh Dill.

Since 1983, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sens. Sean Burrage and Rick Brinkley, and State Reps. Ben Sherrer and Marty Quinn, for their support of our financial assistance programs,” said J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.


July 16, 2014

Talihina Public Works Authority Receives $99,999 Grant to Repair Waste Water System

The Talihina Public Works Authority has received a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s waste water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

Talihina’s sanitary sewer system, which currently serves a population of 1,114, consists of a waste water treatment plant, two lift stations and gravity collection lines comprised of clay and PVC piping. A large portion of the system’s collection lines are more than 40 years old. The town’s sewer system is currently under a consent order with the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, and is experiencing problems with overflows and unpermitted discharges during the period of heavy rain fall due to the inflow and infiltration of storm water. To address these problems, the proposed project includes construction of 1,100-feet of 8-inch PVC sanitary sewer pipe, removal and replacement of 7 man-holes, reconnection of 25 service connections, surface repairs, and other related construction.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Talihina’s 587 customers $179,998 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Jerry Ellis and State Rep. Curtis McDaniel for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Town of Braman Receives $38,500 Grant to Repair Water System

The Town of Braman has received a $38,500 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

The Town of Braman’s existing water distribution system consists of a small amount of 6-inch and 8-inch water line with most of the distribution system consisting of 4-inch and 2-inch lines. The majority of the fire hydrants are connected to the 4-inch lines. These lines have deteriorated, and are not sufficient to give enough fire protection to Braman’s residents and businesses.

In order to address the public safety concern, the OWRB grant will be used for a project that includes construction of 500-feet of 6-inch PVC water line, installation of 3 fire hydrants with 6-inch valves, construction of 200-feet of bore and case with 10-inch steel pipe, and other related construction.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Braman’s 139 customers $69,300 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. The Town of Braman will be contributing $1,000 in local funds to the project as well.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Patrick Anderson and State Rep. Dale DeWitt for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Town of Willow Receives $150,000 Grant to Repair Water System

The Town of Willow has received a $150,000 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

Willow owns and operates a water system that includes three groundwater wells. The town also owns a 47,000 gallon stand pipe. The town recently experienced a water shortage due to the age of two of the system’s three wells. The proposed project includes construction of a test well, construction of one production well, connection to the existing system, and other related construction.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Willow’s 90 customers $270,000 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. The Town of Willow will be contributing $11,000 in local funds to the project as well.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Mike Schulz and State Rep. Todd Russ for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Wanette Public Works Authority Receives $65,500 Grant to Repair Water System

The Wanette Public Works Authority has been awarded a $65,500 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure. The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on July 15.

The grant will be used to construct 2,000-feet of 6-in PVC water line, to conduct 150-feet of borings with 10-inch casing, to install three fire hydrants, and related construction needs. Wanette’s water system currently consists of a master meter for purchase of water from Pottawatomie County Rural Water District #3, one stand pipe for water storage and water distribution lines.

The town has experienced numerous problems with water line breakage due to the age of the system’s current distribution lines. The project will greatly improve the Authority’s capability to provide safe, reliable and adequate delivery of water to its 198 customers.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save the Authority’s customers $117,900 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Susan Paddack and State Rep. Bobby Cleveland for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


July 16, 2014

Wilburton Public Works Authority Receives $7,600,000 Loan from OWRB

The Wilburton Public Works Authority received a $7,600,000 loan Tuesday from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) in order to gain substantial savings on the community’s outstanding water and waste water improvement project debt. The OWRB approved the Financial Assistance Program (FAP) loan during the panel’s regular monthly meeting. The loan proceeds will be used refinance loans that Wilburton had obtained previously to finance water and wastewater system improvement projects in past years.

According to Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, the 1,207 customers of Wilburton Public Works Authority will save an estimated $1,576,569 in interest charges, over the life of the 22-year loan, compared to traditional financing. The FAP loan will be secured with a lien on the revenues of the water, wastewater, and sanitation systems, as well as a recently approved 1.5 percent local sales tax increase. Wilburton Public Works Authority officials attending the OWRB’s monthly meeting in support of the loan application included Wilburton’s Mayor, Stephen Brinlee, and DeDe Richardson, the Public Works Authority Clerk.

Since 1983, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Sen. Larry Boggs and State Rep. Brian Renegar for their support of our financial assistance programs,” said J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.


June 17, 2014

Fairmont Receives OWRB Grant for Wastewater System Project Planning

OKLAHOMA CITY –The Town of Fairmont has received a $27,105.70 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to assist with the planning phase of a significant wastewater system improvement project.  The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on June 17. 

The grant will be used to conduct the planning phase for a later infrastructure project to build new lagoons, a diversion manhole, and a lift station, as well as to install a backup generator, a force main, fencing, and other related construction as necessary.

Fairmont’s wastewater system currently serves 134 customers.  The OWRB REAP grant will be combined with a $39,500 grant from the Northern Oklahoma Development Authority (NODA) to complete the planning phase of the project.  The construction project’s total cost including planning is estimated at $796,660 before final completion.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Fairmont residents more than $48,790.26 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to Senator Patrick Anderson and Representative Dale DeWitt for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


June 17, 2014

Fletcher Public Works Authority Receives OWRB Grant to Repair Collapsed Sewer Line

OKLAHOMA CITY –The Fletcher Public Works Authority has received a $21,471 emergency grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to repair a collapsed sewer line.  The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on June 17. 

The grant will be used to replace 210 feet of 8” concrete sewer line that collapsed on November 8, 2013.  Since the collapse, the Fletcher Public Works Authority has been pumping sewer discharge to the nearest manhole. Mayor Dick Herrin of Fletcher attended the OWRB board meeting in support of the grant application. The Fletcher Public Works Authority currently serves 1,177 customers.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Fletcher residents more than $38,647.80 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. The emergency grant will be combined with $3,789 in local funds to complete the project. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Senator Don Barrington and Representative T.W. Shannon, for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.

 


June 17, 2014

Forgan Public Works Authority Receives OWRB Grant to Repair Water System

OKLAHOMA CITY –The Forgan Public Works Authority has received a $51,400 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure.  The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on June 17. 

The grant will be used to make repairs and improvements to the water system’s well standpipe to address deterioration and to prevent future leaks.  The project work will also include stabilizing the tank floor, electrically grounding the tank, installing a frost proof drain valve, installing an anti-skid ladder, exterior and interior coating, and any necessary related construction.

The Forgan Public Works Authority currently serves 547 customers.  The OWRB REAP grant will be combined with a $56,460 Oklahoma Economic Development Authority REAP grant and a $56,460 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) from Oklahoma Department of Commerce.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Forgan residents more than $92,520 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Senator Bryce Marlatt and Representative Gus Blackwell for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


June 17, 2014

Guthrie Public Works Authority Receives OWRB Loan to Expand Water Service to Coyle

OKLAHOMA CITY –The Guthrie Public Works Authority has received a $470,000 principal forgiveness loan through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to help finance the expansion of water service to the community of Coyle.  The OWRB approved the loan during the agency’s monthly board meeting on June 17.  The loan proceeds will be used to construct a 7,100 feet water line to serve Coyle from an existing water line that currently connects Guthrie’s system to Langston University.

The Guthrie Public Works Authority was created on November 2, 1965, and currently serves 3,740 water customers and 3,087 sewer customers.   Maxine Pruitt, Director of the Guthrie Public Works Authority attended the OWRB board meeting in support of the loan application.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Senator AJ Griffin, and Representatives Jason Murphey and Jason Smalley, for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


June 17, 2014

Hanna Public Works Authority Receives OWRB Grant to Improve Water System

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Hanna Public Works Authority has received a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure.  The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on June 17. 

The grant will be used to repaint the existing storage tank, replace an aerial pipeline crossing, and related construction on a number of items in the water system that need to be upgraded due to the system’s length of service. The Hanna Public Works Authority currently serves 138 customers.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Hanna residents more than $179,998.20 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds.  Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Senator Roger Ballenger and Representative Donnie Condit for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


June 17, 2014

Taloga Public Works Authority receives OWRB grant to expand water infrastructure

OKLAHOMA CITY –– The Taloga Public Works Authority has received a $95,000 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the community’s water infrastructure.  The OWRB approved the grant during the agency’s monthly board meeting on June 17. 

The grant will be used to drill a test water well, a subsequent new water well, and a well house and controls, as well as the installation of a new generator and fencing around the well-site.  The project will help locate an additional water supply as Taloga’s existing four wells are not meeting the community’s increased average daily demand.

The Taloga Public Works Authority currently serves 299 customers.  The OWRB REAP grant will be combined with $6,757.80 in local funds and a $95,000 Community Development Block Grant from the Oklahoma Department of Commerce.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Taloga residents more than $171,000 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds.  Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Senator Bryce Marlatt and Representative Mike Sanders for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.



State-of-the-Art Water Treatment Plant Opens in Broken Arrow


The City of Broken Arrow celebrated the opening of the Verdigris Water Treatment Plant with a ribbon cutting ceremony on June 5. The new plant replaces the city’s existing facility, which was built in 1966.

The plant utilizes a state-of-the-art membrane filtration system that forces water through extremely fine, porous tubes and is capable of filtering out tiny particles and microorganisms, including giardia cysts and cryptosporidium oocysts, to meet new EPA requirements. It is is the largest membrane water treatment facility in Oklahoma and one of the largest in the United States.

The footprint of the new pre-treatment basin has been reduced, which allows for lower land and material costs. The new plant also features a raw water pump station, two pre-sedimentation basins, a six-million-gallon finished water tank, a high service pump station, and three emergency generators that can support the entire plant in the event of a power failure.

Up to 20 million gallons of water per day (MGD) can be produced by the new plant, and this is readily expandable to 40 MGD if necessary. Broken Arrow currently averages 12 MGD, with a peak flow of 27 MGD during the summer months.

For more than thirty years the City of Broken Arrow has purchased water from the Oklahoma Ordnance Works Authority in Pryor. With the completion of the Verdigris Water Treatment Plant this July, Broken Arrow will be able to support its customer’s water needs independently, and will even be positioned to sell water to other nearby providers.

Financing for this state-of-the-art plant was made possible by Oklahoma’s Revenue Bond Loan Program and the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) loan program, which provided $29,755,000 and $35,000,000, respectively.

When compared to traditional financing, OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division expects that Broken Arrow Municipal Authority’s customers will save an estimated $1,618,073 in interest charges over the life of the 20-year DWSRF and 30-year Revenue Bond Program loans.

For more information, please see the Verdigris River Water Treatment Plant brochure.


May 19, 2014

Fairmont Receives Loan To Improve Water Infrastructure

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Fairmont Public Works Authority received a loan Tuesday through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to help finance improvements to the community’s water system. The OWRB approved the $912,000 principal forgiveness loan during the agency’s monthly board meeting.

The loan proceeds will be used to construct a new two mile water line tying into the Salt Fork Water Authority water supply, a new master meter, and a new pump station. The purpose of the project is to lower the arsenic levels in Fairmont’s water supply and to improve water quality by purchasing water from Garfield County Rural Water District (RWD) No. 6.

In January 2014, Fairmont PWA signed a 10-year water purchasing contract with Garfield Co. RWD No. 6. The water will be transported through the newly constructed water line through Garfield Co. RWD No.6’s territory.

According to the contract, the water line’s flow will not exceed 100 gallons per minute. The contract also requires that the water provided to Fairmont be for no more than 100 residential and commercial taps. The price is $6.31 per 1,000 gallons, which can increase if the water cost to the seller increases.

In addition to the OWRB loan, received a REAP Grant from the Northern Oklahoma Development Authority for $45,165 and a Community Development Block Grant for $268,000 to replace old water lines in Fairmont that were allowing significant water loss.

The Fairmont PWA was created on March 3, 1993 and is a public trust. The water system currently serves 65 water customers and 61 sewer customers. Mayor Phil Luginbill attended the board meeting in support of the loan application.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to State Senator AJ Griffin and Representative Dale DeWitt for their continued support of water and wastewater infrastructure funding in Oklahoma,” said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.


May 13, 2014

Funding Availability for Municipalities

EPA's Office of Wastewater Management is making available $335,000 in technical assistance for communities seeking technical support to develop an integrated planning approach to meeting Clean Water Act requirements for municipal wastewater and stormwater management. The primary purpose of the technical assistance is to help EPA develop practical examples of how to implement the different steps in developing an integrated plan in order to provide useful information to communities across the nation who are interested in integrated planning. Interested communities are encouraged to respond to our request for letters of interest. Letters of interest must be received by June 27, 2014, 5:00 p.m. EST. EPA anticipates providing assistance to five communities. If additional funding becomes available, EPA may return to the applicant pool identified through this request to select additional recipient communities. Learn more here.


April 17, 2014

Norman Utilities Authority receives wastewater improvement loan from OWRB

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Norman Utilities Authority received a $50.3 million loan Tuesday from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to facilitate improvements to the Norman Water Reclamation Facility. The OWRB approved the Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan during the panel’s regular monthly meeting on Tuesday.

The loan proceeds will be used for Phase 2 improvements to the Norman Water Reclamation Facility which include upgrades to the existing wastewater treatment plant. These improvements include expanding the plant’s capacity from 12 to 16 million gallons per day.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the Norman Utilities Authority’s 34,525 customers will save an estimated $15,090,000 in interest charges, over the life of the 15-year loan, compared to traditional financing. The CWSRF loan shall be secured with a lien on the revenues of the water and wastewater system.

Norman officials attending the OWRB’s monthly meeting in support of the loan application included Ken Komiske, Director of Utilities, and Mark Daniels, Utilities Engineer.

Since 1983, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to the state legislators of the Norman community for their support of our financial assistance programs,” said J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.


April 17, 2014

Mill Creek Receives Grant to Improve Wastewater System

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) awarded the Mill Creek Public Works Authority a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant on Tuesday to improvements to its wastewater system. The OWRB approved the grant during the panel’s regular monthly meeting this week.

Mill Creek’s current wastewater system serves a population of 319 in Johnston County, and consists of a gravity collection system, a pump station and a treatment system.

The wastewater collection system is currently experiencing intermittent blockages and overflows and high wet weather flows.

The proposed project will include replacement of 8-inch sewer lines and manholes in the areas that are experiencing blockages and wet weather flows.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Mill Creek Public Works Authority customers almost $179,998 in principal and interest charges by not having to borrow the funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved more than $3 billion in loans and grants – including more than $52 million in REAP grants – for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We thank state Sen. Frank Simpson, and state Rep. Charles McCall, for their support of the REAP program," Strong said.


April 17, 2014

Nash Receives Grant to Improve Water Infrastructure

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) awarded the town of Nash a $97,950 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant on Tuesday to finance improvements to the town’s water system. The OWRB approved the grant during the panel’s regular monthly meeting this week.

Nash’s current water system serves a population of 230 in Grant County, and consists of three water wells, a water storage tank, a booster pump station and water mains ranging in size from ¾-inch to 6-inch diameter.

Portions of the water system are currently served by undersized water lines which do not meet the necessary water quantity, pressure and fire protection requirements.

The REAP grant will allow the town to construct new 6-inch water lines, and install new fire hydrants where needed.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Nash water customers almost $176,310 in principal and interest charges by not having to borrow the funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved more than $3 billion in loans and grants – including more than $52 million in REAP grants – for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We thank state Sen. Patrick Anderson, and state Rep. Dale Dewitt, for their support of the REAP program," Strong said.


April 17, 2014

Rogers County Water District Receives State Grant to Improve System

OKLAHOMA CITY – Rogers County Rural Water District No. 16 received a $24,999 grant Tuesday to help finance expansion of the district’s water supply infrastructure. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) approved the funding during the panel’s regular monthly meeting this week.

Created on March 28, 2011, the Rogers County RWD No. 16 currently has no water infrastructure. The district’s seventeen current customers, and thirty potential customers, utilize individual water wells. The customers consistently deal with sulfur issues and an intermittent supply of water.

To eliminate this problem, the district is planning to purchase water from Rogers County RWD No. 3. The proposed project includes the construction of 17,350 linear feet of 4-inch water line, 3,300 linear feet of 2-inch water line, and two master meters.

The project’s total cost is approximately $279,199, and the OWRB grant will be used in conjunction with additional funding from the following sources: $132,200 from Community Resource Group Loan; $10,000 REAP from Grand Gateway Economic Development Association; $82,000 CDBG from Oklahoma Department of Commerce; and $30,000 from the Cherokee Nation.

Charles and Megan Davis represented Rogers County RWD No. 16 at the OWRB meeting in support the grant application.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Rogers County RWD No. 16 customers will save an estimated $44,998.20 by not having to borrow the funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved over $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to state Sens. John Ford and Sean Burrage, and state Reps. Marty Quinn, Ben Sherrer, and Chuck Hoskin for their support of our financial assistance programs,” said J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.


March 19, 2014

OWRB loan to aid in consolidation of two Pittsburg County water districts

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Longtown Rural Water and Sewer District No. 1, a rural water and sewer district in northeastern Pittsburg County, received funding Tuesday to help finance infrastructure projects that will allow the district’s consolidation of Pittsburg County Rural Water District No. 4.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) approved a $600,000 loan during the panel’s regular monthly meeting this week. The loan proceeds will be used to construct a new waterline and a new duplex booster station, to purchase water meters, as well as other related costs necessary for Longtown RWSD No. 1’s consolidation of Pittsburg Rural Water District No. 4. Upon the successful consolidation of Pittsburg County RWD No. 4, the loan to Longtown RWSD No. 1 will be forgiven per guidelines provided by the Environmental Protection Agency.

The board chairman of Longtown RWSD No. 1, Paul Hodge, and secretary, Glen Glover, were joined by Al Tankersley, the former Pittsburg County RWD No. 4 chairman, in supporting the loan application at the OWRB’s meeting.

Created on June 21, 1971, the Longtown RWSD No. 1 currently serves 2,057 customers throughout eastern Pittsburg County. The district will add approximately 100 customers through the consolidation of Pittsburg County RWD No. 4.

Longtown RWSD No. 1 contains 350 miles of water mains and four storage tanks with a combined storage capacity of 867,000 gallons. The district draws surface water from Eufaula Reservoir, and has a water rights permit authorizing the withdrawal of 1000 acre-feet per year.

The state Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) certified Longtown RWSD No. 1 application in regard to compliance with technical program requirements, and recommended approval of the loan from the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF). The DWSRF is administered jointly by the DEQ and the OWRB, and is designed to provide low-interest loans for drinking water infrastructure projects.

Joe Freeman, chief of the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Longtown RWSD No. 1 customers will save an estimated $780,000 in principal and interest charges over the life of the 30-year loan, compared to traditional financing.

“We greatly appreciate the OWRB and the ODEQ. Our water customers will greatly benefit from the improvements that these funds will provide,” said Paul Hodge of Longtown RWSD No. 1.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to state Sen. Larry Boggs, and state Rep. Ed Cannaday for their support of our financial assistance programs,” said J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.


February 27, 2014

Oklahoma Water Resources Board Financial Programs Receive Triple-A Rating

Through AAA ratings and a successful bond sale, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board is set to continue helping finance water infrastructure improvements statewide. On February 25, the OWRB sold approximately $56.1 million in revenue bonds for its State Revolving Fund (SRF) bond programs.

“For over 30 years, the OWRB’s financial programs have benefitted Oklahoma water users by providing water districts and communities with a stable resource for financing water and wastewater projects,” said OWRB Executive Director J.D. Strong. “We take our commitment to serving Oklahoma’s water needs very seriously, and the funds generated by these bonds are important to that mission.”

The OWRB bonds sold this week received an “AAA” rating from all three major ratings services: Moody’s Investor Service, Standard & Poor’s Rating Service, and Fitch Ratings. Citing a number of program and oversight credit strengths in both ratings, the rating services also reaffirmed the AAA rating of the OWRB’s current outstanding debt totaling approximately $581 million.

The OWRB remains the only entity in Oklahoma to hold an AAA rating from all three major ratings services on all financial obligations. Because of the excellent ratings, the OWRB bonds will command a low interest rate from bond buyers.

“This rating directly affects our borrowers in a positive way,” said Joe Freeman, chief of the agency’s Financial Assistance Division. “Because we can provide loans to Oklahoma communities and rural water districts at lower interest rates than from conventional financing sources, it helps them keep their water and sewer rates lower.”

The OWRB lends the funds from bond sales to local entities to finance water and sewage system improvements under the state's Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF).

In addition to the CWSRF and DWSRF programs, the OWRB also administers a third program for waste water and drinking water treatment loans – the State Revenue Bond Loan Program. In November 2013, Standard & Poor’s (S &P) rating service reaffirmed the AAA rating on that program as well.

In a February 2014 review of the State Revenue Bond Loan Program, S&P highlighted Oklahoma citizens’ recent passage of SQ 764, which authorizes the OWRB to issue up to $300 million of state general obligation bonds to help meet the projected multi-billion dollar need of Oklahoma’s water-related infrastructure. “This additional support effectively lowers the financial risk score assigned to the state loan program and allows for an adjustment of the rating to 'AAA',” S&P reported.

The three ratings agencies praised the OWRB for its “strong” and “experienced” financial program management, its “sound” underwriting standards, its “extremely strong” program reserves, and the programs’ “excellent history of borrower repayment” with “no loans in default.”

OWRB Financing Programs by the Numbers

Since its inception in 1985, the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Program has authorized 800 loans totaling more than $3 billion. In addition, the OWRB currently holds 431 outstanding SRF loans issued to 210 borrowers totaling $1.62 billion.

The five largest borrowers (Bartlesville, Lawton, Moore, Oklahoma City and Tulsa) account for just over one-fourth of the loan pool, but no single borrower accounts for more than 11 percent of the total portfolio.

Fitch, S&P and Moody’s pointed to the OWRB programs’ strengths in cash flow, interest earnings, debt-service coverage, and reserves of $89 million.

In fact, Moody’s emphasized that the OWRB’s programs “could withstand a default on over 50 percent of loans” over the next 30 years “and still meet debt service.”


February 18, 2014

Wewoka-Area Rural Water District Receives Grant To Replace Antiquated Water Meters

A Seminole County rural water district received a state grant Tuesday to replace its antiquated meters. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to Seminole County Rural Water District #5 to finance the project.

The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Seminole County RWD#5 was established in 1982 and serves approximately 80 customers in a five square-mile area southeast of Wewoka.

The district’s water meters are almost 30 years old and do not accurately record the amount of water consumed, professional engineer Richard Brown of Stillwater informed the Water Board; however, due to the district’s small size it has been unable to collect enough money to replace the aged meters.

The state grant will be used to replace all service meters, rehabilitate 10 locations where district water lines cross a road, pay engineering and inspection fees, and establish a contingency fund.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Seminole #5 customers almost $180,000 in principal and interest charges by not having to borrow the funds. Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved more than $3 billion in loans and grants – including more than $52 million in REAP grants – for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We thank state Sens. Harry Coates and Susan Paddack, and state Reps. Steve Kouplen and Tom Newell, for their support of the REAP program," Strong said.


February 18, 2014

Tulsa Receives $13.5M in Low-Interest Loans For Continuing Improvements to Sewer System

The City of Tulsa received a pair of low-interest loans Tuesday totaling $13.5 million to finance additional improvements to the municipality’s wastewater treatment system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $10,600,000 loan from the Financial Assistance Program plus a $2,910,000 loan from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the Water Board. Robert Shelton, P.E., Senior Special Projects Engineer, appeared before the Water Board in support of the loan applications.

Blueprints indicate the Tulsa Metropolitan Utility Authority will use the loan proceeds to:

  • replace some equipment at the 66 million-gallon per day Apache sewage lift station, the biggest such facility in the Tulsa sanitary sewer system;
  • pay engineering fees on a project to raise the elevation of the Apache lift station access road;
  • replace dissolved air floatation equipment at the 42 million-gallon per day Northside Wastewater Treatment Plant;
  • construct a storage facility for equipment, materials and oil/solvents to support operations at the Northside WWTP;
  • deposit stone riprap on the sludge lagoon dike at the Northside WWTP;
  • underwrite engineering expenses on expansion of the 15 million-gallon Haikey Creek flow equalization basin and expansion of the Haikey Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant effluent water pumping station;
  • construct an area-wide sanitary sewer overflow mitigation project;
  • install sanitary sewer lines in unsewered areas, and replace some aged sewer lines.

Tulsa has more than 1,900 miles of gravity-flow sewer mains and four dozen lift stations that convey wastewater generated by the municipality’s 129,405 sewer customers to the city’s four sewage treatment plants.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Tulsa utility customers will realize $873,000 in interest savings by borrowing from the Water Board, compared to traditional financing.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved more than $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma, ledgers reflect.

“We thank the Tulsa legislative delegation for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


January 21, 2014

Lenapah Receives REAP Grant For Sewer System Improvements

OKLAHOMA CITY - A town in northern Oklahoma received a state grant Tuesday to renovate some of its aged wastewater collection system.
The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded a $99,675 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant to Lenapah, in Nowata County. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.
Lenapah's wastewater collection system, which serves a population of nearly 300, is approximately 40 years old and suffers from inflow and infiltration problems, consulting engineer H. Dwayne Henderson informed the Water Board.
Smoke tests of the municipal sewer lines indicated that several manholes are the sources of inflow and infiltration that are causing excessive flows to the town's two primary and two secondary sewage treatment lagoons. Consequently, although the lagoons are designed to be a total-retention facility, effluent from the lagoon cells is discharging into a tributary of the Verdigris River.
To correct the problems, five of the town's 97 manholes will be replaced and all of the others will be lined with a cement-like coating, blueprints indicate. In addition, 20 manhole frames will be raised, 45 manhole lids will be replaced and so will five service taps, too.
Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Lenapah residents more than $179,000 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds. "We thank state Sen. John Ford and state Rep. Steve Martin for their support of the REAP program," Strong said.
Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved more than $3 billion in loans and grants – including more than $52 million in REAP grants – for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.



January 21, 2014

Optima Awarded REAP Grant To Rehabilitate Water Well

OKLAHOMA CITY - A Panhandle town received a six-figure state grant Tuesday to rehabilitate a faulty water well.
The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded Optima a $126,250 Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant for the project. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.
Optima, a Texas County community of about 350 population, receives its drinking water from three wells. Because of aging, several components of the wells have begun to fail, Envirotech Engineering and Consultants from Enid informed the Water Board.
The town completed an engineering evaluation of its entire water system and plans to upgrade the system in phases, officials said.
The improvement will begin with replacement of the 50-horsepower turbine pump at water well #1 with a submersible pump. The pump and its motor "have plagued the town with repairs," Envirotech reported. For example, a $20,000 overhaul of the well was performed about three years ago "and now it needs another rebuild."
The renovations will include reworking the well screen and upgrading the supervisory control and data acquisition system, too. Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Optima residents an estimated $227,250 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow the funds.
"We thank state Sen. Bryce Marlatt and state Rep. Gus Blackwell for their support of the REAP program," Strong said.
Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved more than $3 billion in loans and grants - including more than $52 million in REAP grants - for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.


January 21, 2014

OWRB Awards REAP Grant to Fargo To Build New Water Storage Tank

OKLAHOMA CITY - A northwestern Oklahoma town received a state grant Tuesday to help finance construction of a tank that will triple the community's water storage capacity.
The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded Fargo a Rural Economic Action Plan (REAP) grant for the project; the announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.
Fargo has a 50,000-gallon water tower that is not big enough to provide even one day's storage capacity for the Ellis County town of 360 residents, officials reported; in contrast, the state Department of Environment Quality recommends two days of municipal water storage capacity. Average monthly water consumption in Fargo is 2.1 million gallons during winter months, or about 70,000 gallons per day.
Besides its limited capacity, the tank developed a major leak that had to be repaired last year.
Town officials plan to construct a 100,000-gallon water storage standpipe adjacent to the elevated tank. This will allow "easy coordination" with the town's two water wells and their piping, Cardinal Engineering of Woodward wrote. It also will boost the town's water storage capacity to 150,000 gallons, which could prove necessary in the event of an emergency such as a fire or a power failure.
The standpipe project will cost more than $190,000, Cardinal Engineering calculated. Therefore, the $80,917 REAP grant from the OWRB will be coupled with a $56,460 REAP grant from the regional Oklahoma Economic Development Authority and a $56,460 Community Development Block Grant from the state Commerce Department, ledgers reflect.
Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the OWRB's REAP grant ultimately will save Fargo residents an estimated $145,650 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds.
"We thank state Sen. Mike Schulz and state Rep. Dan Fisher for supporting the REAP program," Strong said.
Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved more than $3 billion in loans and grants – including more than $52 million in REAP grants – for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.


January 21, 2014

Skiatook Receives Low-Interest Loan For Preliminary Work on Utility Project

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $520,000 low-interest loan to Skiatook on Tuesday for preliminary work on improvements to the town’s wastewater treatment plants.
The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.
Dan Yancey, Skiatook City Manager, attended the board meeting in support of the loan application.
Skiatook’s population grew 37 percent between 2000 and 2010, to 7,397, the decennial federal census showed. Consequently, over the last nine years, water connections increased 20 percent, to 3,071, and sanitary sewer connections increased 21 percent, to 2,948.
The Osage County town has approximately 26.5 miles of gravity-flow sewer mains and five lift stations that convey sewage to two wastewater treatment plants, records reflect. The Hominy Creek plant is designed to treat 900,000 gallons of wastewater daily, and the Bird Creek plant has a design capacity of 350,000 gallons of wastewater.
The loan proceeds are earmarked for engineering, planning and designing improvements to the two wastewater treatment facilities.
Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the loan from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund will save Skiatook utility customers an estimated $156,000 in interest charges, compared to traditional financing.
Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved more than $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma. “We are grateful to state Sens. Rick Brinkley and Eddie Fields, and state Reps. Sean Roberts and Steve Martin, for their support of our financial assistance programs,” Strong said.


2013


September 17, 2013

Tecumseh Receives Loan To Secure Additional Water Source

OKLAHOMA CITY – A Pottawatomie County community received a low-interest loan Tuesday for a project intended to secure an additional source of water.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $4 million loan to the Tecumseh Utility Authority, announced J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency. The loan will be matched with a $318,400 Community Development Block Grant from the state Commerce Department, ledgers reflect.

Eddy Parker, Mayor, Jimmy Stokes, City Manager, Cathy Condit, City Clerk/Treasurer, and Mike Warwick, City Attorney attended the board meeting in support of the loan application.

The $4.3 million will be used to upgrade the town’s 2 million-gallon per day rapid sand filtration water treatment plant, and to install approximately eight miles of water line to Wes Watkins Reservoir, project blueprints indicate.

Tecumseh’s primary source of drinking water is Tecumseh Lake. However, the water treatment plant was shut down for much of 2012 because of low water levels in the lake.  The city of 6,000 residents was then dependent on production from its water wells until Tecumseh began buying potable water from Shawnee via a connection through the Pottawatomie County Development Authority. Tecumseh also has an emergency connection of limited capacity to Pottawatomie County Rural Water District #3.

Tecumseh purchased water from Shawnee for more than a year until pumping from the replenished Tecumseh Lake resumed in July.

To avoid a repetition of last year’s crisis, officials plan to install a 12-inch diameter waterline from Tecumseh’s water treatment plant to Wes Watkins Reservoir – Tecumseh owns a share of the water rights in the lake – and to enlarge the treatment plant.

The treatment plant renovations will include construction of a clarifier, one lift station, a carbon feed system to remove organic contaminants and to control the taste and odor of the treated water, three metal buildings, a new gravel drive, a new pump and a new generator, plus electrical system improvements and controls.

In addition, three new lagoons will be constructed to accompany three existing lagoons. Each new lagoon will be approximately 259 feet long, 69 feet wide and 13 feet deep, making them capable of holding approximately 1.73 million gallons each.

The state Department of Environmental Quality certified the Tecumseh application in regards to compliance with technical program requirements, and recommended approval of the loan by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board from the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund. The DWSRF is administered jointly by the DEQ and the OWRB, and is designed to provide low-interest loans for drinking water infrastructure projects, Strong related.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Resources Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Tecumseh’s 2,381 water customers will realize an estimated $1.2 million in interest savings over the 30-year life of the state loan, compared to traditional financing.

The loan will be secured with a lien on Tecumseh’s water, sewer, electric, and trash collection systems, a one cent sales tax and perhaps a mortgage on the town’s water and sewer systems, Freeman said.
Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to state Sen. Ron Sharp and state Rep. Josh Cockroft for their support of this project,” Strong said.


September 17, 2013

Frederick Receives $7.38M Loan To Upgrade Sewage Treatment System

OKLAHOMA CITY – A Tillman County community received a multimillion-dollar low-interest loan Tuesday to upgrade its wastewater treatment system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $7,380,000 loan to the Frederick Public Works Authority that will be coupled with $500,000 in local funds for the project. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Mayor Eddie Whitworth and City Manager Robert Johnson attended the board meeting in support of the loan application.

Frederick pipes its sewage to a wastewater treatment plant comprised of an East Lagoon and an Industrial Lagoon that’s located near the airport. The lagoons are flow-through types, with the option to either discharge or land apply.

The city has been ordered by the state Department of Environmental Quality to rehabilitate its sewage lagoons because the treated effluent they discharge violates environmental quality requirements.

The 6.57-acre primary cell of the Industrial Lagoon will be split in equal halves, project blueprints indicate. One-half will be used to develop a pair of aeration lagoons; the other half will be used as a settling lagoon and utilized for expansion in the future, if required. Also, influent lift station pumps will be replaced.

At the East Lagoon, a new secondary storage cell will be constructed, surface aerators will be installed at the primary cell, and the east and north pivots at the East Lagoon land application system will be replaced.

In addition, sludge that has accumulated in both the East and Industrial lagoons from the wastewater treatment process over the years will be removed.

Project engineers said the renovations will improve the sewage treatment process but will not increase the city’s wastewater treatment capacity.

The East Lagoon, which has a primary cell with a surface area of 1.6 acres and two evaporation cells with a combined area of 17.6 acres, can process 1.3 million gallons per day. The Industrial Lagoon, which has the 6.57-acre primary cell and an evaporation cell with a surface area of 6.1 acres, can handle 550,000 gpd, records reflect.

Wastewater from Frederick’s 1,800 customers is collected and delivered to the treatment lagoons via 60 miles of sanitary sewer lines constructed of various materials, including cast iron, clay, concrete, ductile iron and PVC, records show.

Consulting engineers estimate the $7.88 million improvement project will take a year to complete after a Notice to Proceed is issued.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Resources Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the 30-year state loan will save Frederick utility customers an estimated $2,214,000 in interest charges compared to traditional financing.

Freeman said the loan, from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund, will be secured with a lien on the municipality's electric, water, sewer and trash collection receipts, and perhaps a mortgage on the town’s water and sewer systems.  

Frederick received a loan from the Water Resources Board in 2009 for a drinking water project, but this is the first time the city has secured a loan from the Water Board for a wastewater improvement project, ledgers indicate.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We thank state Sen. Tom Ivester and state Rep. Don Armes for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


August 20, 2013

Wagoner Receives $8 Million Loan To Expand Water Treatment Plant

OKLAHOMA CITY - The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved an $8 million low-interest loan Tuesday that will enable the City of Wagoner to enlarge its water treatment plant.

The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

James Jennings, Mayor and Ken Hicks, City Attorney, attended the Water Board's regular monthly meeting to express support for the loan application.

The Wagoner Public Works Authority provides potable water to almost 3,400 customers, including Wagoner County Rural Water District #6. Raw water pumped from Fort Gibson Lake is processed at a 3 million-gallon per day, rapid sand filtration treatment plant.

Proceeds from the state loan will be used to expand the treatment plant to 4 mgd capacity. The project will include construction of a new process building; new clarifiers, filters and water pumps; a new chemical feed system; modifications to the residual lagoons; and rehabilitation of the raw-water intake lines.

Treated water is stored in a 177,000-gallon clear well and in four tanks that have a combined capacity of 1,225,000 gallons of potable water. The water is distributed to customers via a 75-mile network of pipes.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the loan from the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund will save Wagoner utility customers $2.4 million in interest charges over the 20-year debt repayment period.

Freeman said the loan will be secured with a lien on Wagoner's utility revenues and perhaps a mortgage on the city's water and sewer systems.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We thank state Sen. Kim David and state Rep. Wade Rousselot for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


August 20, 2013

Oilton Receives $2.85M Low-Interest Loan To Renovate Wastewater Treatment System

OKLAHOMA CITY - A Creek County town received a low-interest loan Tuesday to upgrade its wastewater treatment system.

The Oilton Public Works Authority received a $2,850,000 loan from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board to finance the project. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Mayor Pat Kennedy attended the Water Board's regular monthly meeting to express support for the loan application.

Oilton has 14.5 miles of gravity-flow collection lines that route sewage from the town's 523 residential and commercial sewer customers to the municipal wastewater treatment plant, which consists of a pair of lagoons that together total nine acres. Oilton has been directed to renovate its wastewater treatment system because its effluent violates environmental regulations.

The proposed improvement project is to include construction of two new lagoons - each one-third acre in size - with mechanical aeration, an influent pump station, two 4,800-gallon chlorine contact basins with a pump station, a 1,728-square-foot filter building with a pair of flocculation tanks and two filter modules and a chemical-feed system, plus a concrete cascade aerator and associated piping.

The project will improve the water quality of treated effluent that Oilton discharges into a tributary of the Cimarron River, civil engineers report.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the loan from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund will save Oilton utility customers $855,000 in interest charges over the 20-year debt repayment period.

Freeman said the loan will be secured with a lien on the city's water and sewer receipts, the proceeds of a 2-cent sales tax, and perhaps a mortgage on Oilton's utility systems.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We thank state Sen. Brian Bingman and state Rep. Skye McNiel for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


July 16, 2013

Custer City Awarded REAP GrantTo Replace Exposed Water Line

A Custer County community received a state grant Tuesday to repair a water line damaged by heavy rains last year.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded a $99,975 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to the Custer City Public Works Authority to finance the project. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Custer City, which has approximately 375 residents, pumps its drinking water from three wells located approximately nine miles east of town. The water is transported from the wells through transmission lines that cross several ravines and tributaries of Deer Creek to a water storage tank and booster pump station four miles east of Custer City.

Heavy rains last year on Little Deer Creek exposed the water transmission line at two creek crossings. "This is the only water supply line to Custer City and needs to be replaced as soon as possible," the Altus engineering firm of Glenn Briggs & Associates advised.

The water supply of hundreds of Western Oklahomans is at risk until the damage is repaired, officials noted. Water consumption from the Custer City well field from July 2011 through January 2012 totaled almost 32 million gallons, ledgers reflect. Usage in Custer City during that period accounted for 17 million gallons, and the town sold nearly 15 million gallons to Custer County Rural Water District #3.

The REAP grant will be used to install the water line across the creek at a greater depth "and without open cuts on the creek banks, which would cause further erosion," Briggs & Associates reported.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save Custer City utility customers approximately $180,000 in principal and interest, because they won't have to borrow funds to make the waterline repairs.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including $52 million in REAP grants, for water and sewer infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We thank state Sen. Mike Schulz and state Rep. Harold Wright for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


July 16, 2013

Atoka County Water District Receives State REAP Grant

A rural water district in southeastern Oklahoma was awarded a state grant Tuesday that will enable it to comply with an environmental requirement.

Atoka County Rural Water District #2 received a $71,500 Rural Economic Action Plan grant from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, announced J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

The district previously operated a two-cell flow-through sewage lagoon system that served a population of approximately 390. However, the lagoons were taken out of service after a lift station was constructed in 2010 to pump the district’s sewage to Atoka’s wastewater treatment plant.

RWD#2 has been ordered by the state Department of Environmental Quality to modify the district’s primary lagoon and close its secondary lagoon. According to consulting engineers Mehlburger Brawley of McAlester, the work will entail covering the lagoon sludge, performing earthwork and site grading.

The project will cost an estimated $99,999 and will be financed with the proceeds from the REAP grant coupled with $28,499 in district matching funds, ledgers reflect.

The primary lagoon will be used as an emergency flow-equalization basin, officials said. Any time a power failure occurs at the lift station, the district can divert its wastewater into the flow-equalization basin “holding pond” until electricity service is restored.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the state grant will save Atoka County RWD#2 customers an estimated $128,700 in principal and interest, because they won’t have to borrow those funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including $52 million in REAP grants, for water and sewer infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We thank state Sens. Josh Brecheen and Jerry Ellis, and state Rep. Bobby Cleveland, for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


July 16, 2013

Garfield County RWD#6 Gets Grant For Project to Repaint Four Water Tanks

A rural water district in central-northwest Oklahoma received a state grant Tuesday to help pay for repainting several of its water storage tanks.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded a $68,000 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to Garfield County Rural Water District #6. The district will contribute $32,000 in matching funds for the project, said J.D. Strong, OWRB Executive Director.

The district's system is comprised of four water wells, several water storage standpipes, and 550 miles of water distribution lines primarily in the eastern side of Garfield County but also extending into Noble County.

Four of the standpipes need a facelift, Wdb Engineering of Oklahoma City informed the Water Board. The tanks "surpassed their paint's lifecycle several years ago," consulting engineer David Wyatt wrote. Consequently, he said, the condition of the standpipes "will continue to rapidly deteriorate if no action is taken."

The $100,000 in dedicated funding is earmarked for a fresh coat of paint on the four tanks. Blueprints indicate that at the district's Fairmont, Garber, and Billings tanks, the interior will be sandblasted and painted, while the exterior will be washed and receive an overcoat. Both the interior and exterior of the Hunter tank will be sandblasted and painted. Nothing will be done at this time to the district's other water storage tanks at Covington and Boss, officials reported.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the state grant will save the  customers of Garfield #6 an estimated $122,400 in principal and interest charges by not having to borrow that money.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including $52 million in REAP grants, for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We appreciate state Sens. A.J. Griffin and Mike Schulz, and state Reps. John Enns and R.C. Pruett, for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


July 16, 2013

Depew Receives State REAP Grant To Renovate Its Aged Water System

A Creek County town received a state grant Tuesday to renovate some of its aged water system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded an $81,000 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to the Depew Public Works Authority for the project. The grant will be coupled with $10,086 in local funds.

The Depew PWA owns and operates a water and sewer system that serves a population of approximately 500. Groundwater is pumped from three wells, chlorinated, and then stored in a water tower.

Because of its age and size, Depew's water system needs to be overhauled and enlarged, according to engineering consultants Poe & Associates of Tulsa. However, due to the projected expense, the improvements will have to be constructed in phases.

Blueprints indicate that in the first stage, the $91,086 will be earmarked to replace the pumps in two of the town's wells with larger pumps, upgrade the electrical wiring and controls at all three wells, replace the roofs on two of the pump buildings, to buy a spare well pump for use in the event of an emergency, and install a new 6-inch diameter water line.

The new line is intended to connect a proposed fourth well to the distribution system at the site of a proposed new water storage standpipe in the southwest corner of town. A new storage tank is needed to boost water pressure in town and because the existing, 65,000-gallon water tower is old and inadequate; water consumption in Depew averages about 53,000 gallons per day, Poe & Associates calculated.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, estimated that the REAP grant will save Depew utility customers nearly $146,000 in principal and interest payments by not having to borrow the funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including $52 million in REAP grants, for water and sewer infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We appreciate Senate President Pro Tempore Brian Bingman and state Rep. Skye McNiel for their support of our financial assistance programs," OWRB Executive Director J.D. Strong said.


July 16, 2013

Water Resources Board Approves REAP Grant For Upgrade at Lone Chimney Water Plant

A state grant was approved Tuesday to help finance an equipment upgrade at a water treatment plant owned and operated by a north-central Oklahoma water wholesaler that has had to impose rationing.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded the Lone Chimney Water Association a $99,990 Rural Economic Action Plan grant that will be coupled with $35,010 in matching funds from the association. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.

The Lone Chimney Water Association is the sole or primary source of drinking water for Yale, Glencoe, Morrison, Blackburn, Skedee, Maramec and Terlton, and a supplemental source of water for Pawnee and Cleveland. Besides its municipal customers, the association also sells water wholesale to 51 East Water Inc., Pawnee County Rural Water Districts #2, #3 and #4, Payne County RWD#4, Noble County RWD#2, and Lincoln County Rural Water and Sewer District #4.

Lone Chimney Lake is a source of drinking water for approximately 16,500 people in four counties according to estimates by the state Department of Environmental Quality.

The association draws its water from Lone Chimney Lake, which is south of Pawnee and encompasses 514 surface acres in normal conditions. However, the lake shrunk precipitously in droughts in 2006, 2010, and again last year.

The association operates a 2 million-gallon per-day water treatment plant located two and a half miles north of Glencoe and about seven miles south of Pawnee.

The LCWA treatment plant is equipped with four multimedia filters, each with a surface area of 160 square feet. According to consulting engineers Mehlburger Brawley of Oklahoma City, the Lone Chimney filters were designed to process a maximum of almost 3.4 million gallons of water daily.

Those filters are cleaned by back-flushing them with water. The treatment plant has a 275,000-gallon backwash lagoon plus a pair of clarifier waste lagoons where the dirty water is stored. The east lagoon has a maximum retention capacity of 925,605 gallons and was cleaned last year, Mehlburger Brawley reported. The west lagoon has a total volume of slightly more than a million gallons, but that holding pond "is full of sludge and is in need of cleaning," the engineers said.

In addition, the backwash water decant pumping station "has outlived its useful life and has deteriorated to the point that it is not functional and major rehabilitation is required," the consultants wrote.

An ability to decant the backwash water--draw off clear water at the top without disturbing the residuals at the bottom of the pool--to the headworks of the water treatment plant would save a substantial amount of water, the engineers maintain. It would enable the LCWA to conserve "5 percent to 10 percent of their water--perhaps 60,000 to 120,000 gallons per day," Mehlburger Brawley estimated.

The $135,000 from the state grant and the local funds is earmarked for rehabilitation of the backwash decant pumping station. Blueprints indicate the project will consist of replacing two 75-horsepower, 150-gallon per-minute pumps and installing new interior piping, guide rails, a chain and hoist mechanism and electrical controls.

In a related matter, construction on an 11.5-mile, 12-inch diameter pipeline that will convey potable water from Stillwater's water treatment plant to Lone Chimney's water distribution system is expected to be finished in September.

Lone Chimney Lake will remain the association's primary water source and the pipeline to Stillwater will be a backup, emergency line, officials said. However, the LCWA will be obligated to take-or-pay for two million gallons of treated water each month.

Stillwater gets its raw water from Kaw Lake, an impoundment on the Arkansas River that covers 27 square miles in Kay County.

The LCWA-Stillwater pipeline project is being financed with a 30-year, $3,355,000 low-interest loan from the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund that the Water Resources Board approved last September.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save LCWA customers almost $180,000 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow the money.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including $52 million in REAP grants, for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We appreciate state Sens. James Halligan, Eddie Fields, and A.J. Griffin, and state Reps. Lee Denney and Dennis Casey, for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


July 16, 2013

Westville Receives State REAP Grant To Connect Customers to City Sewer

A state grant was received by Westville on July 16 that will pay approximately two-thirds of the cost of connecting new customers to the town's sewer system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded a $72,300 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to the Westville Utility Authority, according to J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency. The grant will be coupled with $27,669 in local matching funds plus $7,000 in local "in kind" labor, records reflect.

Westville, an Adair County community of approximately 1,750 residents, has a central sewage collection/treatment system. However, locations in the south-central part of town have septic tank systems that are failing, consulting engineer Paul Douglas Harvell of Sallisaw reported.

Blueprints indicate two sewer line extensions--675 linear feet of 8-inch diameter PVC pipe and 535 linear feet of 6-inch PVC pipe--will be installed to connect those customers to the town's central sewer system. The two lines are essential to enable the wastewater from those locations to be transported to the municipal sewage treatment facility, Harvell wrote.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Westville utility customers will realize approximately $130,000 in principal and interest savings from the REAP grant by not having to borrow that money.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including $52 million in REAP grants, for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We appreciate state Sen. Wayne Shaw and state Rep. William Fourkiller for their support of our financial assistance programs," Strong said.


July 16, 2013

Mayes County RWD#6 Gets Loan to Enlarge Its Water Treatment Plant

A rural water district in northeastern Oklahoma received a low-interest loan Tuesday to help finance expansion of its water treatment plant.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved the $2.59 million loan to Mayes County Rural Water District #6 during the panel’s regular monthly meeting here, announced J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency. The loan proceeds will be coupled with $484,650 from the Cherokee Nation to finance the project, Strong added.

Doug Ray, District Manager and David Wyatt, Project Engineer, appeared before the board in support of the loan application.

The $3,074,650 will be used to increase the capacity of the district’s water treatment plant by 50 percent, records reflect.

Blueprints indicate the $3,074,650 project will include installation of new filters, a new decant pump station, and new pump stations. The project also will include construction of a new 350,000-gallon water storage clearwell; it will replace an existing 68,000-gallon clearwell where treated water is stored prior to being pumped into the district’s 350-mile network of water distribution lines.

The improvements will boost the plant’s treatment capacity from 1 million gallons per day to 1.5 mgd, officials said. The district filters and disinfects raw water that is drawn from Lake Hudson under a contract with the Grand River Dam Authority. The treatment plant is situated on the west side of the lake.

The RWD#6 water system also includes five booster pump stations and five standpipes that have a combined storage capacity of nearly half a million gallons of treated water.

Water consumption in the district last year totaled a little over 126 million gallons, an average of 10.5 million gallons per month.

The district has 1,742 residential and commercial customers plus two wholesale buyers: the Town of Adair and Mayes County Rural Water District #8. Water connections in RWD#6 increased by almost one-fourth between 2000 and 2012, ledgers show.

The Mayes County RWD#6 service territory ranges – roughly – from the Craig County line on the north, north/south Road 433 on the west, extending around the northern and eastern perimeters of Adair, south along Road 437, down to the lower end of Lake Hudson, then northeasterly back to the Mayes/Craig county line, skirting Salina and passing to the west of Langley.

The state Department of Environmental Quality certified the Mayes County RWD#6 application in regards to compliance with technical program requirements, and recommended approval of the loan from the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund. The DWSRF is administered jointly by the DEQ and the OWRB, and is designed to provide low-interest loans for drinking water infrastructure projects, Strong related.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Mayes County RWD#6 customers will save an estimated $777,000 in interest charges over the life of the 30-year loan, compared to traditional financing.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

“We are grateful to state Sens. John Ford, Sean Burrage, and Kim David, and state Reps. Doug Cox, Chuck Hoskin, and Ben Sherrer, for their support of our financial assistance programs,” Strong said.


June 18, 2013

Haileyville Gets REAP Grant To Rehabilitate Sewer System

A Pittsburg County community received a state grant Tuesday to renovate its wastewater collection system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to the Haileyville Public Works Authority. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Haileyville is under orders from the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to upgrade its sewer system because of impermissible sewage discharges. Haileyville experiences overflows and unpermitted discharges during periods of heavy rainfall "due to the infiltration and inflow of storm water," consulting engineers Mehlburger Brawley of McAlester informed the Water Board.

The town's wastewater collection system consists primarily of clay tile lines plus some PVC plastic piping. Wastewater from the town's 364 sewer customers is conveyed to a 130,000-gallon per day sewage treatment plant, Mehlburger Brawley related.

Much of the sewer piping is in "poor condition," the consultants wrote. "Any significant rain event typically results in system failures..." The solution, the engineers said, is to remove and replace approximately 1,100 linear feet of 8-inch-diameter sewer main, along with approximately seven manholes.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance, calculated that the REAP grant will save Haileyville's utility customers an estimated $180,000 in principal and interest, by not having to borrow the funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including approximately $52 million in REAP grants, for water and sewer infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We are grateful to state Sen. Larry Boggs and state Rep. Brian Renegar for their support of our programs," Strong said.


June 18, 2013

Oaks Receives REAP Grant to Help Finance New Wastewater Treatment, Disposal System

A northeastern Oklahoma community received a state grant Tuesday that will help finance a new wastewater treatment system for the town.

The Oaks Public Works Authority was awarded a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan grant by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

The Delaware County community of approximately 400 residents has been ordered by the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to correct deficiencies in its sanitary sewer system.

Oaks’ wastewater treatment plant is in “extremely poor condition,” consulting engineers Holloway, Updike and Bellen wrote in a report. The storage lagoon leaks and the wastewater irrigation pump station doesn’t work, they said. The facility is “not a good candidate for rehabilitation,” the consultants added.

Consequently, local officials plan to construct an entirely new wastewater treatment plant and abandon the existing facility. Blueprints indicate two new raw wastewater treatment lagoon cells plus a secondary storage lagoon will be constructed, along with a new electric pump station, and a new wastewater irrigation field will be created.

The lagoons will be able to accommodate 36,000 gallons of wastewater per day, and will be designed to hold the wastewater for 90 days, officials indicated. Collectively, the three lagoon cells will encompass three and one-half surface acres, records show.

The sanitary sewer project will cost an estimated at $1,589,499, and will be financed with federal, state and Native American funding, ledgers reflect. Besides the REAP grant from the Water Resources Board, the Cherokee Nation has pledged a $351,454 grant; the state Commerce Department has approved a $250,000 community development block grant; a Grand Gateway Economic Development Association REAP Grant of $60,500; an Indian Health Services Grant $78,547; and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Development arm has approved a $423,000 grant and a $326,000 loan.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Oaks utility customers an estimated $180,000 in principal and interest payments, by not having to borrow those funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including approximately $52 million in REAP grants, for water and sewer infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We are grateful to state Sen. Wayne Shaw and state Rep. William Fourkiller for their support of our programs," Strong said.


May 21, 2013

Central Oklahoma Water District Gets REAP Grant from State Agency

A central Oklahoma rural water district received a state grant Tuesday to replace some aged, deteriorated equipment.

Canadian County Rural Water and Sewer District No. 5 was awarded a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan grant from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Rural Water and Sewer District #5 of Canadian County formerly was known as Heaston Rural Water Corp., documents show.

RW&SD#5 buys potable water from El Reno and resells it to the district's 250 water customers southwest of El Reno. The district encompasses approximately 80 square miles. Treated water is kept in a 150,000-gallon storage tank and is distributed through a network of approximately 58 miles of lines; most of the system was constructed 41 years ago, records indicate.

Myers Engineering of Oklahoma City reported that the district needs to replace its booster pump station at the El Reno Airport, because of significant corrosion. Rust could allow contaminants to enter the water distribution system, officials noted.

The repair project will entail construction of a new booster station surrounded by a security fence, installation of a backup power generator, lighting and heating, plus a small equipment storage area.

The REAP grant will be coupled with $44,105 in district funds to finance the improvements, which will cost an estimated $144,104.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the grant will save the district's customers approximately $180,000 in principal and interest charges by not having to borrow the funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including approximately $52 million in REAP grants, for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We are grateful to state Sen. Ron Justice and state Rep. Todd Russ for their support of our programs," Strong said.


May 21, 2013

Chattanooga Receives State Grant To Replace Dilapidated Water Line

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved funding Tuesday that will pay for replacement of half a mile of antiquated, dilapidated water lines in a Southwestern Oklahoma town.

The Chattanooga Public Works Authority will receive a $99,650 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to finance the project, said J.D. Strong, executive director of the OWRB.

Chattanooga, a community of approximately 461 residents, has 225 water customers, ledgers reflect.

Over the years the PWA has replaced most of the original 4-inch and 6-inch diameter sand-cast water lines in town with durable PVC plastic pipe. (Previously, iron pipes were cast in sand molds; consequently, they were commonly referred to as sand-cast pipes.)

There still are three sections of 4-inch sand-cast water lines in Chattanooga that need to be replaced, consulting engineer Stephen B. Cesar of Altus informed the Water Board. The section most in need of replacement is the 4-inch line on Second Street between Taylor and Washington Avenues, Cesar said; that line is shallow and badly deteriorated.

The older lines in town are "generally in poor condition and contain rust and mineral deposits that contribute to low water quality," Cesar reported. In addition, the existing 4-inch lines in Chattanooga cannot accommodate pumper fire truck hose connections "and are not sufficient to provide effective fire protection with modern firefighting equipment," the civil engineer said.

The state grant will pay for replacement of 2,650 linear feet of the 4-inch sand-cast line with new 6-inch PVC pipe, and installation of four new fire hydrants, blueprints indicate.

The project will improve the town’s water delivery system from Van Buren Avenue to Washington Avenue, Cesar indicated. “This will provide the townspeople with better fire protection and good-quality water" from its wells, said Strong.

The antiquated line between Taylor and Van Buren will be replaced in a separate project, Cesar said.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Chattanooga residents an estimated $179,370 in principal and interest by not having to borrow the funds.

The grant awarded Tuesday was the second Chattanooga has received from the Water Board in less than a year. The board approved a $43,498 state drought grant last September that was coupled with $7,677 in local funds to finance a third water well.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including approximately $52 million in REAP grants, for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We are grateful to state Sen. Don Barrington and state Rep. Don Armes for their support of our programs," Strong said.


May 21, 2013

Western Oklahoma Water Provider Receives State Grant to Develop Alternate Source

A western Oklahoma water provider was awarded a state grant Tuesday to finance development of an alternate source of drinking water.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $99,850 Rural Economic Action Plan grant for the Frontier Development Authority. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

The town of Butler owns and operates Frontier Development Authority. Butler lies near the junction of S.H. 44 and S.H. 33 in Custer County, approximately 14 miles north of Interstate 40 and about three miles north of Foss Lake.

The Authority sells water to 369 customers in the rural areas of Custer County around Foss and in the vicinity of Butler.

Frontier DA has been buying water from Hobart's allotment in the nearby reservoir, and receiving it at the Foss Master Conservancy District Water Treatment Plant.

The Authority is concerned that Hobart may need the water from Foss because Rocky Lake, Hobart’s alternate source of water, is deemed critical due to the protracted drought. If the drought persists, Foss, too, may become critical as a primary water source.

Consequently, the Frontier Development Authority wants to develop its own water supply system to provide an alternate or supplemental source of drinking water.

The Authority plans to drill a test well east of the Foss dam to find an ample source of groundwater. Frontier has permission to drill on some land that produced an irrigation well rated at 800 gallons per minute (1.15 million gallons per day), Briggs said; that well is no longer in use, he added.

Frontier Development Authority's annual water usage is 24.2 million gallons, an average of a little over 2 million gallons per month.

Besides the test well, the grant proceeds also will be used to develop a producing well, installing the well pump and constructing a well house, project blueprints show.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Frontier DA customers an estimated $179,244 in principal and interest charges by not having to borrow the funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including approximately $52 million in REAP grants, for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We are grateful to state Sen. Mike Schulz and state Rep. Harold Wright for their support of our programs," Strong said.


May 21, 2013

Roger Mills Utility District Gets State Grant To Rehabilitate Sewage Collection System

A western Oklahoma utility district received a state grant Tuesday to repair its wastewater collection system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $99,124 Rural Economic Action Plan grant for Rogers Mills Rural Water, Sewer, and Solid Waste Management District #3. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

The district collects and treats wastewater from the town of Reydon, a community of approximately 200 residents about four miles east of the Texas state line.

Sewage flows by gravity from town to a lift station that pumps the wastewater into the community's sewage lagoon system, which consists of two primary treatment lagoons and two secondary treatment ponds. The lift station has two pumps, one of which is broken and cannot be repaired, while the other is of "marginal" quality and needs to be replaced.

In addition, a sewer system evaluation study discovered root intrusion at the bottom of several manholes, at some of the district's 91 customer service connections, and in some service lines.

The repair project will entail replacement of both lift station pumps with two new submersible pumps, replacement of 1,443 linear feet of sewer lines with new 8-inch diameter PVC lines, and installation of six new concrete manholes.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board's Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the state grant will save Rogers Mills RWS&SWMD#3 customers an estimated $178,423 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow the funds.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has approved $3 billion in loans and grants, including approximately $52 million in REAP grants, for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements throughout Oklahoma.

"We are grateful to state Sen. Mike Schulz and state Rep. Dan Fisher for their support of our programs," Strong said.


April 16, 2013

Tulsa Receives Another Loan For Wastewater Treatment Renovations

The Tulsa Metropolitan Utility Authority will receive a $9.85 million low-interest loan to finance continuing, extensive repairs to its wastewater treatment system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved the loan Tuesday, announced J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Robert Shelton, City Engineer appeared before the board in support of the loan application.
The loan proceeds will be used on four major wastewater treatment system projects, records reflect:

  • Northside Wastewater Treatment Plant nitrification rehabilitation. Blueprints indicate the project will include replacing final clarifier launder covers, mud valves, aeration train gate valves, waste pumps and waste return pumps, blower cooling jackets, bio selector mixers and switch gear. The Northside WWTP was constructed in 1958. Its treatment capacity is rated at 42 million gallons of wastewater per day.
  • Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant odor control. The improvements will include construction of an odor control biofilter for the 71st Street dewatering facility and design of odor control plans for the South Side intermediate pump station. The Southside WWTP is more than half a century old. Its treatment capacity is rated at 42 million gallons per day.
  • Haikey Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant aeration basin study and repairs. The proposed project will feature a study of aerators and will recommend short-term and long-term solutions for aeration. The study will be jointly funded by the TMUA and Broken Arrow through the Regional Metropolitan Utility Authority, a joint venture among the cities of Tulsa, Broken Arrow, Jenks, Bixby and Owasso. The RMUA operates the Haikey Creek WWTP and is performing studies on future facilities. The Haikey Creek WWTP is about 36 years old. Its treatment capacity is rated at 16 million gallons per day.
  • Mingo, Coal and Flatrock flow equalization basin improvements. That project will entail minor renovations to improve diversion of flow by installing flow meters in the basins, adding hoist rails for pump maintenance, and replacing sluice gates. A flow equalization basin adjusts flow rates to keep the wastewater flow to the treatment plant steady. The basin provides storage to hold wastewater when it arrives too rapidly, and to supply additional water when it arrives slower than desired.

Since 1983 the OWRB has approved more than $2.9 billion in loans and grants to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities across Oklahoma.

Tulsa makes frequent use of the Water Board’s financial assistance programs. For example, the TMUA received a $32.5 million low-interest loan from the Water Resources Board last month to rehabilitate some dilapidated sewers, replace several sewer lines buried underneath some streets, and to extend the city’s central sewer system to several areas that have failing septic systems.

“We thank the Tulsa legislative delegation for their support of our financial assistance programs,” Strong said.


March 19, 2013

Water Resources Board Approves Grant for Fairland Wastewater Project

A northeastern Oklahoma community received a grant Tuesday that will help finance a significant environmental improvement to its wastewater treatment system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to the Fairland Public Works Authority, announced J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

The OWRB’s grant will be combined with a $50,000 REAP grant from Grand Gateway Economic Development Association, $3.9 million in loans and grants from the U.S.D.A., plus $400,000 in local revenue, ledgers reflect.

The $4.45 million is earmarked for a major renovation to the town’s sewage treatment system, which serves 959 customers.

Fairland has a 16.4 million-gallon four-cell sewage lagoon treatment system that is not in compliance with revised wastewater discharge limits.

To correct the problem, blueprints indicate the city plans to construct a 13.6 million-gallon lagoon cell, lined with a synthetic membrane, for storage of treated wastewater. Also planned is a land application system for disposal of treated wastewater on 40 acres the town owns close to the treatment facility and on a portion of 200 acres the town owns three-quarters of a mile west of the lagoons.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the OWRB’s REAP grant will save Fairland’s 959 utility customers almost $180,000 in principal and interest payments, by not having to borrow that money.

Since 1983 the OWRB has approved more than $2.9 billion in loans and grants to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities across Oklahoma.

“We thank state Sen. Charles Wyrick and state Rep. Larry Glenn for their support of our programs,” Strong said.


March 19, 2013

Garfield County Rural Water District Receives Loan To Improve Service, Refinance Debt at Fixed Rate

A large rural water district in northern Oklahoma received a low-interest loan Tuesday to enhance its system and to refinance a debt at a fixed interest rate.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved an $865,000 loan for Garfield County Rural Water & Sewer District #5 that will be coupled with over $200,000 in system funds. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Jack Herrian, District Manager, appeared before the board in support of the loan application.
The local funds and loan proceeds will be used to construct 6.9 miles of 6-inch-diameter water lines in the northeastern quadrant of the district to increase water supply and pressure in the area, blueprints indicate.

The balance of the funds will be used to refinance a loan the district received from the OWRB in 1988 to install water supply lines in several subdivisions in its area.

The rural district provides potable water in approximately 400 square miles of a 532 square-mile area of Garfield and Kingfisher counties; the exceptions include Enid, Waukomis, Hennessey and Breckinridge.

The district’s boundaries range from north/south Garfield County Road 277 on the west (approximately 10 miles west of Waukomis), to north/south Garfield County Road 296 (Breckinridge) on the east, and from Lake Hellums Road north of Enid to east/west County Road 63 on the south, which is about the southern edge of Hennessey.

The district pumps groundwater from two wells, and stores treated water in four standpipes that have a combined capacity of 450,000 gallons.

Garfield County RW&SD#5 has more than 750 customers, and its water connections increased 13.6 percent over the past 10 years, records show.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Garfield #5 customers will realize an estimated $95,850 in interest savings over the 30-year life of the loan from the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Program, compared to traditional financing. The district also is locking in the debt at a fixed rate, Freeman added.

Since 1983 the OWRB has approved more than $2.9 billion in loans and grants to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities across Oklahoma.

“We thank state Sens. Patrick Anderson and A.J. Griffin, and state Reps. Mike Jackson, John Enns, Mike Sanders and Dale DeWitt, for their support of our programs,” Strong said.


March 19, 2013

Grove Receives $7M Loan To Renovate Water Treatment Plant

The Grove Municipal Services Authority received a multimillion-dollar low-interest loan Tuesday to renovate its water treatment plant.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $7,050,000 loan that is to be coupled with $270,000 in local revenue for the extensive project. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the agency.

Jim Ford, Chairman and Kenneth Fitch, Trustee of the Authority appeared before the board in support of the loan application.

Blueprints indicate the funds will be used to construct two raw-water intake pumps, two rapid-mix tanks, four water-treatment basins; to equip four sedimentation basins with an automatic track-mounted sludge vacuum and three rapid sand filters; to replace the dual media in the treatment plant’s six existing filters with multimedia; to enlarge the 300,000-gallon clearwell where treated water is stored before being pumped into the distribution system; to install two high-service pumps, and to modify the existing sludge lagoons to increase capacity.

Grove draws raw water from Grand Lake and cleans and disinfects it in a 4.4 million-gallon per day treatment plant. Treated water is stored in six standpipes and an elevated tower that have a combined capacity of 5.35 million gallons, officials reported. The town’s distribution system consists of approximately 200 miles of water mains and half a dozen booster pump stations.

The Delaware County municipality has 5,681 water customers, ledgers reflect. Water connections in Grove increased 16 percent in the past eight years.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Grove utility customers will save an estimated $2,115,000 in interest charges over the 20-year life of the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan, compared to traditional financing.

Since 1983 the OWRB has approved more than $2.9 billion in loans and grants to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities across Oklahoma.

“We thank state Sen. Charles Wyrick and state Rep. Doug Cox for their support of our programs,” Strong said.


March 19, 2013

State REAP Grant to Help Finance Construction of New Southeastern Oklahoma Water District

The final piece of financing needed for construction of a water distribution system to serve northern McCurtain County and southern LeFlore County was secured Tuesday.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved a $99,900 Rural Economic Action Plan grant for McCurtain County Rural Water District #6, which was established about three and one-half years ago. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

The REAP grant from the Water Board will be coupled with a $569,000 grant from the Choctaw Nation, a $350,000 Community Development Block Grant from the state Commerce Department, a $23.6 million loan/grant combination from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Development arm, plus $52,300 in local funds, to finance the massive project.

Northern McCurtain County is one of the largest areas in Oklahoma that does not have a reliable and safe public water system.

Residents of the area are dependent on wells that produce low-quality water. “The water characteristics are not uniform from one well to another, but generally the water is moderately hard” and dissolved solids “exceed the recommended limits” in some instances, SMC Consulting Engineers reported. Because of the poor quality of the groundwater, many residents in the area are compelled to drink bottled water. In addition, the wells do not produce enough water to ensure regional fire protection, the consulting engineers reported.

According to the Oklahoma City engineering firm, most of the wells in the affected area range in depth from 60 to 150 feet. However, at least one resident “who has been using household water directly from Eagle Creek” hired a driller who went down 400 feet “and was unable to make any kind of well,” the consultants wrote.

Consequently, the $24.68 million is earmarked for development of a central water system that will buy water processed at the Broken Bow treatment plant and distribute it through a network of pipes extending, roughly, from Broken Bow in south-central McCurtain County northerly to five miles into southern LeFlore County.

Blueprints indicate the project will include construction of 85 miles of water lines ranging in size from 12 inches in diameter down to 2-inch lines, at least one water storage tank, two pump stations initially and three more later, a chlorine station for additional disinfection of the water at remote reaches of the system, plus several fire hydrants throughout the affected area.

SMC Consulting Engineers said the principal distribution artery of the system will stretch from Honobia east along Highway 144 to Octavia, then along Highway 259 south to Mt. Herman, Carter Mountain and the Broken Bow water treatment plant. Branches of the system will extend from Highway 259 along main roads through communities east and west of the main artery, and additional lines will extend from these branches to individual customers, businesses and populated areas.

Communities that will be served by the system include Mt. Herman, Bethel, Battiest, Pickens, Sherwood, Cooperville, Clebit, Smithville, Beachton, Zafra, Watson, Buffalo, Nanih Chibo, Plunketville, Octavia, Ludlow, Honobia, plus the McCurtain County Wilderness Area.

The consultants estimate the number of potential customers on the system at 720 to 1,000.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the OWRB’s REAP grant will save customers of McCurtain County RWD#6 approximately $180,000 in principal and interest charges, by not having to borrow those funds.

Since 1983 the OWRB has approved more than $2.9 billion in loans and grants to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities across Oklahoma.

“We thank state Sen. Jerry Ellis and state Rep. Curtis McDaniel for their support of this badly needed project,” Strong said.


March 19, 2013

Seiling Receives $3.2M Loan To Extend Utility Lines, Refinance Bonds

A Dewey County community received a multimillion-dollar loan Tuesday to extend municipal utility lines to a new commercial development, and to refinance bonds that paid for construction of the town’s water treatment plant.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board approved the $3.2 million low-interest loan to the Seiling Public Works Authority on Tuesday. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Karen Riffel, Town Administrator appeared before the board in support of the loan application.
A portion of the funds will be used to pay off bonds issued in 2000 to finance construction of Seiling’s 720,000 gallon-per-day reverse osmosis water treatment plant.

The balance of the funds will pay for extending municipal water and sewer services to a new commercial area northwest of Seiling. That project is expected to include construction of a truck stop with a truck wash plus two restaurants.

To serve the development, the Seiling Public Works Authority plans to install two miles of 12-inch diameter sewer line and two miles of 12-inch and 6-inch water lines to the commercial area, plus almost 1.3 miles of 6-, 8- and 12-inch water lines inside the addition. The project also will include construction of a 250,000-gallon water storage tank and a 900-gallon per minute water pump station, blueprints indicate.

Cardinal Engineering of Woodward reported that Seiling has water storage capacity of about 50,000 gallons, which is not enough to satisfy current demand, much less any community growth. The quarter-million-gallon standpipe will be stationed at a higher elevation, and will be augmented by the pump station, in order to provide adequate pressure to serve the new businesses and anticipated residential growth in the vicinity.

Seiling currently has 495 water customers and 403 sewer customers, records show. Water and sewer connections increased by more than 10 percent over the past seven years, city officials said.

The town has three water wells, and two more are being developed, Cardinal Engineering informed the Water Board. Treated water is distributed in Seiling through a 22-mile network of PVC, cast-iron and ductile iron pipes.

The new sewer line will increase flow to the sewage treatment lagoons. Nevertheless, the municipal wastewater collection system, which has approximately 10 miles of sewer mains, “will be able to convey the additional flow and the lagoon system has adequate capacity to absorb this growth,” the consulting engineers wrote.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the loan from the state agency’s Financial Assistance Program will save Seiling utility customers an estimated $870,000 in interest charges over the life of the debt, compared to traditional financing.

The loan will be secured with a lien on the receipts from the town’s water, sewer, sanitation and gas systems, the proceeds of a 2-cent city sales tax, and a mortgage on the town’s water, sewer and gas systems, Freeman said.

Since 1983 the OWRB has approved more than $2.9 billion in loans and grants to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities across Oklahoma.

“We thank state Sen. Mike Schulz and state Rep. Mike Sanders for their support of these programs,” Strong said.


March 19, 2013

Shawnee Receives $14M Loan To Refinance Wes Watkins Lake Debt

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board voted Tuesday afternoon to extend a $14 million loan that will enable the Shawnee Municipal Authority to refinance a debt issuance at a lower interest rate and to shorten the debt repayment period.

The $14 million loan from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board’s Financial Assistance Program was announced by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Brian McDougal, City Manager, Cynthia Sementelli, Finance Director, Steve Nelms, Interim Utility Director, and Greg Price Interim Systems Plant Manager appeared before the board in support of the loan application.

The loan will be to refinance debt issued in 2003 to pay for construction of Wes Watkins Reservoir (also known as the North Deer Creek Reservoir).

Shawnee draws raw water from Shawnee Lake, Wes Watkins Reservoir and Twin Lakes in Pottawatomie County, and is permitted to draw water from the North Canadian River when necessary, records reflect.

The Municipal Authority provides treated water to more than 11,540 customers in and around the city limits, including the nearby town of Meeker, officials reported. Shawnee’s water connections increased by 6.4 percent over the past decade, ledgers indicate.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Shawnee utility customers will realize an estimated $2.5 million in interest savings over the life of the state loan, compared to traditional financing.

“We are grateful to state Sens. Ron Sharp and Harry Coates, and state Reps. Justin Wood, Josh Cockroft and Tom Newell, for their support of our financial assistance programs,” Strong said.

Since 1983 the OWRB has approved more than $2.9 billion in loans and grants to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities across Oklahoma.


March 19, 2013

Tulsa Receives $32.5M Loan For Various Sewer Improvements

The City of Tulsa received a $32.5 million low-interest loan Tuesday to rehabilitate some sewers, replace several sewer lines buried underneath some streets, and to extend the city’s central sewer system to several areas that have failing septic system.

The loan from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board was announced by J.D. Strong, executive director of the agency.

The loan proceeds will be spent on projects in five distinct areas, officials reported.

  • Tulsa’s sanitary sewer system will be extended to areas dependent on septic systems that are failing. Those areas include Romoland, Grimes Heights Phase 2, Quail Point, Deatherage Addition, 11th Street Acres, Forest Oaks, and an unplatted area on 11th Street.
  • Sewers plagued by inflow and infiltration will be rehabilitated at several locations throughout the City.
  • These projects are a continuation of rehabilitation of the wastewater collection system that began in 2008, city officials noted.
  • Several sewer lines that are underneath streets, either in the right-of-way or crossing the street, will be replaced. The work will be performed in conjunction with street repairs that the Tulsa planned from the 2008 street bond issue.
  • An 11.4 million-gallon expansion will be constructed to the fourth cell of the Cherry Creek flow equalization basin.
  • An extension to the main interceptor for the lower Nickel Creek Basin, to serve the unsewered area, will be designed.

Since 1983 the OWRB has approved more than $2.9 billion in loans and grants to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities across Oklahoma.

“We thank the Tulsa legislative delegation for their support of our financial assistance programs,” Strong said.


Feb. 19, 2013

Bromide Awarded State Grant To Rehab Deteriorated Sewer System

A southeastern Oklahoma community received a state grant Tuesday to renovate its dilapidated sanitary sewer system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to Bromide, a town of approximately 175 residents in northeastern Johnston County. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Bromide’s aged sewage collection lines are in poor condition, consulting engineers Mehlburger Brawley of Oklahoma City reported; when it rains, the collection system experiences “high levels of inflow and infiltration.” Stormwater intrusion into the deficient lines results in impermissible sewage discharges from the town’s wastewater treatment lagoons, the engineers wrote.

In addition, the town’s sewage lift station, which pumps wastewater to the sewage lagoons for treatment, has been malfunctioning because of old pumps and an aged control panel and electrical system.

Consequently, Bromide is under orders from the state Department of Environmental Quality to rehabilitate its sewer system, Mehlburger Brawley related.

Project blueprints indicate the state grant is earmarked for rehabilitation of the lift station, replacement of two manholes, replacement of 400 linear feet of 8-inch-diameter wastewater collection line, and for associated work.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that because of the REAP grant Bromide residents will realize almost $180,000 in principal and interest savings by not having to borrow the funds.

“We are grateful to state Sen. Josh Brecheen and state Rep. Charles McCall for their support of this program,” Strong said.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has extended more than $2.9 billion in grants and loans to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities throughout Oklahoma.


Feb. 19, 2013

Bromide Awarded State Grant To Rehab Deteriorated Sewer System

A southeastern Oklahoma community received a state grant Tuesday to renovate its dilapidated sanitary sewer system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan grant to Bromide, a town of approximately 175 residents in northeastern Johnston County. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Bromide’s aged sewage collection lines are in poor condition, consulting engineers Mehlburger Brawley of Oklahoma City reported; when it rains, the collection system experiences “high levels of inflow and infiltration.” Stormwater intrusion into the deficient lines results in impermissible sewage discharges from the town’s wastewater treatment lagoons, the engineers wrote.

In addition, the town’s sewage lift station, which pumps wastewater to the sewage lagoons for treatment, has been malfunctioning because of old pumps and an aged control panel and electrical system.

Consequently, Bromide is under orders from the state Department of Environmental Quality to rehabilitate its sewer system, Mehlburger Brawley related.

Project blueprints indicate the state grant is earmarked for rehabilitation of the lift station, replacement of two manholes, replacement of 400 linear feet of 8-inch-diameter wastewater collection line, and for associated work.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that because of the REAP grant Bromide residents will realize almost $180,000 in principal and interest savings by not having to borrow the funds.

“We are grateful to state Sen. Josh Brecheen and state Rep. Charles McCall for their support of this program,” Strong said.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has extended more than $2.6 billion in grants and loans to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities throughout Oklahoma.


Feb. 19, 2013

Chouteau Receives Low-Interest Water Board Loan To Refinance 2006 Bonds at Reduced Rate

A Mayes County community secured a low-interest loan Tuesday to refinance some bonds that were used to construct a new wastewater treatment plant.

The Chouteau Public Works Authority received a $3,525,000 loan from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board that will be coupled with $135,000 in local reserves. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Jerry Floyd, the Chairman of the Authority attended the board meeting in support of the application.

The funds will be used to refinance the portion of the Authority’s 2006 revenue bonds that paid for construction of a new 3.2 million-gallon per day wastewater treatment plant, Strong said.

The loan will be secured with a lien on Chouteau’s water, sewer, sanitation and natural-gas systems, the proceeds of a 1-cent city sales tax, and a mortgage on the city’s water and sewer systems, records reflect.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that by borrowing the money from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund, Chouteau utility customers will realize an estimated $1,418,196 in interest savings over the 23.5-year life of the loan.

“We are grateful to state Sen. Kim David and state Rep. Ben Sherrer for their support of our financial assistance programs,” Strong said.

Besides the wastewater treatment plant, Chouteau’s sanitary sewer system includes 18 miles of sewage collection mains and three lift stations.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has extended more than $2.9 billion in grants and loans to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities throughout Oklahoma.


Feb. 19, 2013

Hanna Receives OWRB Grant To Upgrade Aged Water System

A small McIntosh County community received a state grant Tuesday to upgrade its aged water system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded the Hanna Public Works Authority a $99,900 Rural Economic Action Plan grant for the project. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Hanna, in southwestern McIntosh County, operates two water wells that provide drinking water to local residents and to the nearby town of Vernon Brown Engineering of Stillwater evaluated the water system in Hanna and found a dozen improvements that need to be made “due to aging” of the equipment. However, since the community cannot afford an expense of that magnitude – more than $400,000 – the consultants suggested applying for the REAP grant to finance several “immediate needs.”

Those include constructing a new clearwell with the capacity to hold at least one day’s average storage, or approximately 30,000 gallons of potable water; moving water chlorination equipment out of the pump station room and into a separate building; replacing the electrical wiring in the pump station so the building will have lights; replacing the overhead door and the windows in the pump station building; and installing a quick pump connection to one of the lift stations.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the REAP grant will save Hanna’s water customers an estimated $180,000 by not having to borrow the funds.

“We are grateful to state Sen. Roger Ballenger and state Rep. Donnie Condit for their support of this program,” Strong said.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has extended more than $2.9 billion in grants and loans to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities throughout Oklahoma.


Feb. 19, 2013

Indiahoma Awarded REAP Grant To Repaint Water Storage Tank

A southwestern Oklahoma town received a state grant Tuesday to rehabilitate its water storage tank.

The Indiahoma Public Works Authority was awarded a $59,762 Rural Economic Action Plan grant by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Indiahoma, in Comanche County, has a 210,000-gallon standpipe that was last painted more than a decade ago and has interior problems that affect the water quality, Lester Seiger of Landmark Engineering reported.

Indiahoma owns a well and blends its groundwater with potable water purchased from the CKT Water District, which buys water from Snyder that is pumped from Tom Steed Lake.

Project blueprints indicate the REAP grant will be used to clean and paint the interior and exterior of Indiahoma’s steel water tank, which is 100 feet tall and 19 feet in diameter, and to replace approximately 150 linear feet of 4-inch-diameter line with 6-inch PVC waterline.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that the state grant will save Indiahoma residents an estimated $107,571 in principal and interest, by not having to borrow the funds.

“We are grateful to state Sen. Randy Bass and state Rep. Don Armes for their support of the REAP program,” Strong said.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has extended more than $2.9 billion in grants and loans to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities throughout Oklahoma.


Feb. 19, 2013

Wakita Awarded REAP Grant To Renovate Sewage System

A northern Oklahoma community received a state grant Tuesday to renovate its aged, deteriorated wastewater collection system.

The Oklahoma Water Resources Board awarded Wakita a $125,141 Rural Economic Action Plan grant that will be coupled with $10,191 in local funds. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Myers Engineering of Oklahoma City said Wakita’s sanitary sewer collection lines were manufactured of vitrified clay and were constructed approximately 60 years ago. “The system is essentially worn out,” the consultants reported.

During an inspection, “several direct breaks or points of infiltration into the pipelines” were discovered, joints were in “extremely poor condition,” and the slope of the gravity-flow pipe was deteriorated to the point that water ponds in the lines, Myers continued. Also, some manholes need to be replaced and elevated “to prevent inflow from surface water.”

The poor condition of the sewage collection system in the Grant County town limits the community’s “growth potential and expansion,” Myers noted. In addition, the state Department of Environmental Quality has ordered the town to correct the shortcomings and could impose fines for non-compliance, the engineers pointed out.

Most of the primary sewer lines in Wakita have been replaced, but not the 8-inch sewer main “that receives the entire town’s sewage flow” and routes it to the lift station that pumps sewage to the town’s wastewater treatment lagoons. In a related matter, the sewage lift station has a pair of pumps that “are in very bad condition and are worked on and repaired constantly,” Myers informed the Water Resources Board.

Project blueprints indicate the $135,332 in state and local funds will be used to replace the 8-inch sewer main with 1,120 linear feet of 10-inch PVC pipe, replace five sewer manholes, install two new submersible pumps in the lift-station, and perform associated work.

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Wakita residents will realize an estimated $225,250 in principal and interest savings from the REAP grant, by not having to borrow the funds.

“We are grateful to state Sen. A.J. Griffin and state Rep. Dale DeWitt for their support of the REAP program,” Strong said.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has extended more than $2.9 billion in grants and loans to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities throughout Oklahoma.


Feb. 19, 2013

Yale Receives REAP Grant for Water Treatment Plant

A Payne County community received a state grant Tuesday that will help pay the cost of constructing the town’s first-ever water treatment plant, thereby enabling the city to secure a supplemental source of drinking water.

The Yale Water and Sewage Trust was awarded a $99,999 Rural Economic Action Plan grant by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. The announcement was issued by J.D. Strong, executive director of the state agency.

Yale needs an additional source of water due to the critical condition of its sole source of water, Lone Chimney Lake north of Yale in Pawnee County.

The Lone Chimney Water Association is a water wholesaler to approximately 16,000 north-central Oklahomans in nine communities and five rural water districts. The reservoir is the sole or primary source of water for Yale, Glencoe, Morrison, Skedee, Blackburn, Maramec and Terlton; a supplemental source of water for Pawnee and Cleveland; and provides water to five school districts within that area.

In normal circumstances the lake encompasses about 514 surface acres northeast of Glencoe, but has not been full in two and a half years, since July 2010. Due to the lingering drought, Lone Chimney has shriveled precipitously; the lake was about 12 feet below normal, down to only about 4 feet, on Feb. 8, Yale City Manager Clara Welch reported. “Needless to say, it’s critical.”

The lake was in danger of drying up in 2006, as well, when it shrunk to a little over 10 feet below normal.

As a direct result of the nagging drought, the association received a $3.355 million low-interest loan from the Water Resources Board last September to finance construction of an 11.5-mile, 12-inch diameter pipeline to convey potable water from Stillwater to Lone Chimney.

The Lone Chimney Water Association signed a contract last year to buy at least 2 million gallons of treated water per month from the Stillwater Utilities Authority, which draws its raw water from Kaw Lake in Kay County.

The pipeline to Lone Chimney’s system will tie into a distribution line from Stillwater but is not operational yet; construction started in January and is not expected to be completed until late September.

Because of the dire circumstances, the Lone Chimney Water Association has ordered mandatory water rationing and has imposed stiff surcharges on its customers as leverage to compel conservation.

Literally and figuratively, “We can no longer afford to have just one water supply,” Mrs. Welch asserted. “We need an alternate water source.”

For decades the town was dependent on wells drilled south of town, near the banks of the Cimarron River. After those wells gradually became salty, Yale joined the Lone Chimney consortium and became a co-owner of the lake in 1992 along with Glencoe, Pawnee and several rural water districts.

The original water wells were plugged and a few years ago the City of Yale drilled three new water wells about one-half mile north of the old Norfolk school, on state school land, as a backup supply for use in emergencies. Those wells are shallow and the state Department of Environmental Quality considers them to be “under the influence of surface water,” McCleary wrote. As a result, Mayor Terry Baker said, the Yale Water and Sewage Trust can employ those wells only if it issues a boil order to all users of the water, or if the water is properly treated.

For reasons of cost and water quality, then, Yale city officials decided to construct a treatment plant to filter and disinfect the well water. The facility “will utilize a packaged treatment train consisting of flocculation, settling and mixed-media filter,” and will have a maximum treatment capacity of 100 gallons of water per minute, McCleary wrote in his engineering report. The treatment plant will be built near the west side water tower, Mrs. Welch said.
The wells will continue to be “just a supplement,” the city manager emphasized; Lone Chimney Lake will remain the town’s chief source of water. However, “We’ll use as much water from those wells as we can,” the mayor asserted.

The $99,999 REAP grant from the Water Resources Board will be coupled with a loan commitment from a bank to finance construction of Yale’s water treatment plant, records indicate. Municipal Engineering Group estimated the treatment plant price tag at approximately $660,000.

“We’re probably six months away from finalizing the project,” City Manager Welch said recently. “We still have to advertise for bids on construction and complete all the paperwork.”

Joe Freeman, chief of the Water Board’s Financial Assistance Division, calculated that Yale utility customers will realize almost $180,000 in principal and interest savings from the state REAP grant, by not having to borrow that money.

“We are grateful to state Sen. Eddie Fields and state Rep. Lee Denney for their support of the REAP program,” Strong said.

Since 1983 the Water Resources Board has extended more than $2.9 billion in grants and loans to improve and enhance the water and wastewater infrastructure needs of communities throughout Oklahoma.


Passage of State Question 764 in November 2012 allows the OWRB’s Financial Assistance Program to meet much of the state’s projected $82 billion water and wastewater financing need. The new Water Infrastructure Credit Enhancement Reserve Fund, created through a constitutional amendment approved by voters, essentially establishes a $300 million pledge of credit that enables the OWRB to leverage funds in the bond market as water and sewer projects become ready for construction.



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